The Moment of Change reviewed at Tor.com

Brit Mandelo has reviewed the Moment of Change at Tor.com. I cannot but admire this review, and not because it is so positive.  I have long admired Brit’s ability to write lucidly and powerfully about speculative fiction (as can be evidenced in her series of Tor.com essays on Queering SFF and Reading Joanna Russ, as well as her recent Aqueduct book We Wuz Pushed: Joanna Russ and Radical Truth-Telling). In this review, Brit Mandelo beautifully articulates and analyzes my vision for the anthology:

First, I will say that there is a great deal of anguish in this book: the anguish of silenced voices, of the belittled and ignored, the anguish of suffering as well as the anguish of circumscribed success. However, there is also a sort of wild, free-wheeling determination bound up in and spurred on by that anguish—a desire for freedom, a desire for recognition, a desire for the moment in which the poem transcends mere text and speaks truths. This tonal resonance—the conflict between themes of anguish/containment and freedom/wildness—is struck by the opening poem, Ursula K. Le Guin’s “Werewomen,” and continues to resound throughout the entire collection, scaling up and down in intensity but always somehow present as a shapely concern within the poems and their organization.

 

Another thing that sets the tone for the text is the fact that the book opens with, and is titled from, an Adrienne Rich poem about the nature of poetry: the poet, poem, and the moment of change in which the poem exists are all tangled up together as one object, as one thing. This tri-natured sense of poetry informs and guides The Moment of Change, where poems are the poets writing them and vice versa, where the consciousness of feminism and intersectional identity blends with the written form to capture a moment of shifting—a moment of change. As such, most of these poems have a sense of movement; they are not simply lovely snapshots with an argument made via resonance, but have narrative, emotional pressure, and a sense of development or epiphany.

I am tempted to quote the whole review, but you should, if you are so inclined, head over to Tor.com and read it there instead.

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